Africans In Tech: One Woman’s Quest to Provide Resources to Women in Tech

Africans in Tech

Dada holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Sciences and real estate certification from Temple University. She is also a certified Scrum Master. Her technical experience includes corporate work as an application developer, business/ systems analyst, quality assurance tester, and technical project manager.

As the principal of Signature RED, she offers tech consulting services to companies and creates tools and resources for women interested in careers in technology. In 2017, she created the Tech Women Network – a searchable, online platform and community for women with technical skills.

Dada has a growing passion to empower women who typically work behind-the-scenes in STEM fields to be seen and heard. Over the years she has hosted several educational events and workshops including Building iOS Mobile Apps, Rails Girls, Techies Who Brunch, and HUE Tech Summit for women of color in tech.

In the summer, she gives back through her nonprofit Signature Red Cares whose main program, Project ALOE provides care packages and advice to college-bound girls. Dada has been recognized in several media outlets for her innovative ideas, leadership skills, and community involvement. Additionally, she is a diversity in tech contributing writer for ForbesWomen

What does technology represent to you and why did you choose this field?

Technology represents opportunity and the potential to change lives. Looking back, the field chose me. Growing up I’d always been more of an artsy person.

I loved music, dance… anything to do with self-expression. When I got to college, I struggled with choosing a major because there was a part of me that wanted to work in the entertainment business or go to law school.

In the end, I saw that I was strong in my STEM classes and knew that I didnt’ want to study medicine or engineering so I “settled on” computer science.

Now I can see how I was always meant to be in the field. Even with my love for the arts, I’m a visionary and innovator and those are qualities that are important in the technology industry.

How important has branding been to you?

It’s extremely crucial and it can be challenging. For someone like me who doesn’t fit in one box per se, sometimes just saying that I’m xyz isn’t enough. I create things and when I see gaps I try to create solutions to solve them. When I look at what I do across the board I always see three common factors: education, community (bringing like-minded people together), and empowerment.

Has Social Media networking played any positive part in your professional growth?

Yes. I use it for personal and professional purposes but I also follow people whose career I admire. It’s a good way to create virtual “mentors”.

As an African woman in tech, what is the most significant challenge you have faced professionally?

I’ve faced several challenges along the way. I think the most significant challenge to date is realizing that I had to pivot to get back into tech and pivot with my original idea for the Tech Women Network. Knowing when it’s important to change direction and how to do it is very challenging but very rewarding.

It is believed that we are being launched into the third industrial revolution, and this digitization will consequently change the politics of jobs. How do you think women in Africa can take advantage of this to advance and stay relevant?

Identify opportunities…. Pay attention to what is happening and think of ways to get involved. Continue reading

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